Europe and Mediterranean: France Intensive Voyage

Azamara

Experience the style and allure of French culture when you spend seven days sailing along its breathtaking coast. Enjoy chic boutiques, seaside splendour, and winding cobblestone streets brimming with history, art, market delicacies, and apothecaries. Whether you're craving a transformational experience or simply wish to acquire a fresh perspective, we welcome you to embrace endless possibilities aboard the new Azamara Onward.

Included Extras

  • AzAmazing Evenings® event (on most voyages of seven nights or longer)

  • Select standard spirits, international beers and wines

  • Bottled water, soft drinks, specialty coffees and teas

  • Self-service laundry

  • Shuttle service to and from port communities where available

  • Concierge services for personal guidance and reservations

  • Gratuities

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members earn an annual 2% Reward on Costco Travel purchases

Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Azamara sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of CallBarcelonaDeparture 5:00p.m.

Overview

Barcelona is a charming, cosmopolitan port on the shores of the Mediterranean sea. This prosperous and bilingual (Spanish and Catalan) metropolis measures up to a city such as Madrid: its museums, theatres, art galleries and nightlife area of an impressive high standard. Besides that, this art and design centre has a lot of interesting sights to offer to its visitors. The best place to watch people go by, to stroll or simply relax, is 'Las Ramblas', a pedestrian street with dozens of outdoor cafes. Here, you’ll find flower-stands, book kiosks and small market stalls where they sell birds and small animals. You’ll also find an endlessly fascinating flowing receptacle of pageant-jugglers, singers, dancers, puppeteers, sidewalk artists, living statues and assorted oddballs on parade. Nearby is 'Plaça Real', with plenty of bars and restaurants, and 'Palau Guell', built by the Catalan architectural genius Antoni Gaudi in his undulating art-nouveau style. After having seen these sights, stroll the narrow winding streets of the 'Barri Gotic', the medieval Gothic quarter full of interesting tapas bars and cafes. Check out Picasso’s old hangout, 'Els Quatre Gats', which has been renovated without losing its bohemian charm. Or head for the old Barceloneta section on the waterfront. This working-class area, which was always slightly rundown and scruffy-looking, is now packed with paella restaurants. The new beach area, which runs from Barceloneta to the Olympic village, is much cleaner than the old beach area. Although some people believe that it has been cleaned up considerably, it might be a wise idea to stay out of the water. Fortunately, the beach itself is already a feast for the eyes (and ears), with its huge and roaring waves.

Day 2Port of CallPort-VendresArrival 7:30a.m.Departure 6:00p.m.

Overview

As the only natural port along the côte Vermeille between the Mediterranean, the Pyrenees and Spain, Port-Vendres was known already to the Greek mariners of antiquity. The port flourished after the french conquest during the 17 th century. It was this maritime prosperity which led to the construction, in the 18 th century, of a splendid urban complex around the port, symbolised today by the place de l'Obelisque. Today Port-Vendres is both a deep-water commercial port and a fishing and yachting harbour open all year round. With its creek beaches it offers every seaside leisure facility. Set on the magnificent rocky slopes overlooking Port-Vendres are the prestigious vineyards of Banyuls, wich also produce the Collioure appelation. Come and discover Port-Vendres and the Cote Vermeille, under the radiant Catalan skies...

Day 3Port of CallSeteArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 10:00p.m.

Overview

Sete is a major port city in the southeast French region of Occitanie. It’s bordered by the Etang de Thau, a biodiverse saltwater lagoon. Across a narrow isthmus, Sete’s Mediterranean coast is lined with sandy beaches. The top of Mont St Clair offers views of the city, known as “Venice of the Languedoc” for its canal network. The Musee Paul Valery has displays on the history of Sete, plus an art collection.

Day 4Port of CallMarseilleArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 10:00p.m.

Overview

Marseille, a port city in southern France, has been a crossroads of immigration and trade since its founding by the Greeks circa 600 B.C. At its heart is the Vieux-Port (Old Port), where fishmongers sell their catch along the boat-lined quay. Basilique Notre-Dame-de-la-Garde is a Romanesque-Byzantine church. Modern landmarks include Le Corbusier’s influential Cite Radieuse complex and Zaha Hadid’s CMA CGM Tower.

Day 5Port of CallSaint-TropezArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 10:00p.m.

Overview

Saint-Tropez is a coastal town on the French Riviera, in the Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur region of southeastern France. Long popular with artists, the town attracted the international "jet set" in the 1960s, and remains known for its beaches and nightlife. The cobblestoned La Ponche quarter recalls its past as a fishing village, although yachts now outnumber fishing boats in the Vieux Port (Old Port).

Day 6Port of CallCannesArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 4:00p.m.

Overview

"Star" of the Riviera is a magical city, a place of pleasures : sport, gastronomy, leisure, shows, discovery... Cannes gives to every instant of your days and nights the personal touch that transforms your life into a festival. Cannes is opening its doors to allow you to discover a unique and memorable city, renowed around the world. The Suquet, the Croisette, the Royal Residences, the Palais des Festivals... are offered to you, along with the charms of history and the reality of a city entering the 21st century.

Day 6Port of CallNiceArrival 7:00p.m.

Overview

"Nice, the capital of the Cote d'Azur, is perhaps the most visited city along the Mediterranean, and stays busy year around. Thanks to the many festivals, exhibitions, expositions and the traditional carnival, Nice has grown into the modern, bustling city it is today. I can't imagine not being 'smitten' with this beautiful place and its spectacular surroundings. Take a walk along the renowned 'Promenade des Anglais', and you'll know what I mean. A melting pot for visitors from around the globe, this elegant palm-lined street follows the beach along the Baie des Anges (Bay of Angels). Across the street, an endless string of fancy hotels, restaurants and chic shops seems to go on for miles. "margin-top:0.6em;Perhaps the best known building along this strip, and certainly the most spectacular, is the Hotel Negresco. Built in 1912 and always catering to those with money, it's an architectural marvel, elaborate to say the least with wonderful details. But don't expect to be able to catch a glimpse of the interior unless you have a reservation. The entrance is well guarded and sneaking in is virtually impossible (although we tried!). Another well known building is the Ruhl Casino, home of the high rollers! The Hotel Meridien is part of the grand structure which also houses a top notch restaurant and a Cabaret, featuring lively shows (a la Moulin Rouge!) and concerts. ;The beach in Nice, although a wide crescent shape and picturesque, can be a disappointment if you are not prepared for the fact that it's not sandy. Instead, you'll find smooth pebbles and rocks, but regardless, by mid-day it will be packed! Entrepreneurs capitalize on the fact that you'll need a lounge chair to sun bathe comfortably, and they can be rented everywhere, along with colourful umbrellas. Prices vary from place to place, depending whether or not you choose an area with wooden decking built over the rocks, or whether or not you want to include a lunch. Numerous small restaurants line the beach, inviting you to sit down, relax, and enjoy the spectacular view of the Baie des Anges or just, well, people watch!! The sea is crystal clear and blue, gentle waves roll the small pebbles back and forth, creating a unique sound. Swimming and sun bathing is a favourite activity here and even away from the beach, you can hardly find a spot, rock outcropping, or cove, without people having claimed it for the day. In sharp contrast to the hustle and bustle of the Promenade, visiting the old part of Nice is like stepping back in time. The buildings along the narrow streets date back to the 17th century, small alleyways are lined with little shops selling local merchandise, and outdoor cafes are to be found everywhere. In fact, this is where I had the best pizza ever, smothered with four cheeses, a true culinary delight! The Flower Market here shouldn't be missed. Not only can you admire stand after stand with the most beautiful and colourful arrays of flowers and plants, but you'll find an abundance of fresh produce (vegies, marvelous fruits, olives, etc.), meats, fish, cheeses and baked goods. Your taste buds will be tempted beyond imagination, you can even sample some of the delectable goods and I can guarantee that you won't leave empty handed! A popular stop for tourists is the Russian Orthodox Cathedral with its spectacular five domes and colourful exterior. It's quite beautiful, unfortunately the interior was closed at the time of our visit. On a plateau, 300 feet above Nice, are the remains of an old fortress. Now a park, this area is perfect for an excellent overview of Nice, the beach and the Bay. You can reach it by a series of steps at the end of the Promenade, or by elevator just below the steps. A huge man-made waterfall cascades down from the top, and you can stroll through the beautiful Castle gardens or visit the Naval Museum. Nice boasts a number of excellent art museums, such as the Musee Cheret and the Musee National de Marc Chagall, displaying works of four centuries of European art. We arrived in Nice by cruise ship and docked in the colourful 'Port Lympia' (port of the clear water), one of the prettiest ports in the Mediterranean. If you are energetic, you can walk from here to the Promenade des Anglais and even to the old town. But no visit to Nice would be complete without exploring the surroundings. If you don't have a lot of time, you might want to consider the short drive to the isolated, medieval village of Eze, which clings like an eagle's nest to the top of a rock, 1400 feet above the sea. Take the Middle Corniche Road to get there, on the way marvel at the gorgeous villas built into the hills, the beautiful flowers and gardens, and at virtually every turn, the magnificent view of the Bay below.perched so high on the rocky peak, has managed to preserve its medieval appearance. Vehicles have to be left below, leaving you to explore this magical place on foot. Narrow, tiny streets wind upward through the village, each building has been meticulously preserved, now housing quaint shops, even a small hotel and restaurant. If I were an artist, this is where I would have to test my skills, each turn revealing a picture so pleasing to the eye. Old stone walls draped with colourful flowers, small arched doorways leading into cool, almost cave-like rooms, where merchants display their wares, and way up on top, a sprawling, exotic cactus garden, unlike any I've ever seen before. Top that off with spectacular panoramic 360 degree views, terra cotta roofs, green hillsides, and the blue sea far below and you'll have to pinch yourself to make sure it's real.

Day 7Port of CallNiceDeparture 10:00p.m.

Overview

"Nice, the capital of the Cote d'Azur, is perhaps the most visited city along the Mediterranean, and stays busy year around. Thanks to the many festivals, exhibitions, expositions and the traditional carnival, Nice has grown into the modern, bustling city it is today. I can't imagine not being 'smitten' with this beautiful place and its spectacular surroundings. Take a walk along the renowned 'Promenade des Anglais', and you'll know what I mean. A melting pot for visitors from around the globe, this elegant palm-lined street follows the beach along the Baie des Anges (Bay of Angels). Across the street, an endless string of fancy hotels, restaurants and chic shops seems to go on for miles. "margin-top:0.6em;Perhaps the best known building along this strip, and certainly the most spectacular, is the Hotel Negresco. Built in 1912 and always catering to those with money, it's an architectural marvel, elaborate to say the least with wonderful details. But don't expect to be able to catch a glimpse of the interior unless you have a reservation. The entrance is well guarded and sneaking in is virtually impossible (although we tried!). Another well known building is the Ruhl Casino, home of the high rollers! The Hotel Meridien is part of the grand structure which also houses a top notch restaurant and a Cabaret, featuring lively shows (a la Moulin Rouge!) and concerts. ;The beach in Nice, although a wide crescent shape and picturesque, can be a disappointment if you are not prepared for the fact that it's not sandy. Instead, you'll find smooth pebbles and rocks, but regardless, by mid-day it will be packed! Entrepreneurs capitalize on the fact that you'll need a lounge chair to sun bathe comfortably, and they can be rented everywhere, along with colourful umbrellas. Prices vary from place to place, depending whether or not you choose an area with wooden decking built over the rocks, or whether or not you want to include a lunch. Numerous small restaurants line the beach, inviting you to sit down, relax, and enjoy the spectacular view of the Baie des Anges or just, well, people watch!! The sea is crystal clear and blue, gentle waves roll the small pebbles back and forth, creating a unique sound. Swimming and sun bathing is a favourite activity here and even away from the beach, you can hardly find a spot, rock outcropping, or cove, without people having claimed it for the day. In sharp contrast to the hustle and bustle of the Promenade, visiting the old part of Nice is like stepping back in time. The buildings along the narrow streets date back to the 17th century, small alleyways are lined with little shops selling local merchandise, and outdoor cafes are to be found everywhere. In fact, this is where I had the best pizza ever, smothered with four cheeses, a true culinary delight! The Flower Market here shouldn't be missed. Not only can you admire stand after stand with the most beautiful and colourful arrays of flowers and plants, but you'll find an abundance of fresh produce (vegies, marvelous fruits, olives, etc.), meats, fish, cheeses and baked goods. Your taste buds will be tempted beyond imagination, you can even sample some of the delectable goods and I can guarantee that you won't leave empty handed! A popular stop for tourists is the Russian Orthodox Cathedral with its spectacular five domes and colourful exterior. It's quite beautiful, unfortunately the interior was closed at the time of our visit. On a plateau, 300 feet above Nice, are the remains of an old fortress. Now a park, this area is perfect for an excellent overview of Nice, the beach and the Bay. You can reach it by a series of steps at the end of the Promenade, or by elevator just below the steps. A huge man-made waterfall cascades down from the top, and you can stroll through the beautiful Castle gardens or visit the Naval Museum. Nice boasts a number of excellent art museums, such as the Musee Cheret and the Musee National de Marc Chagall, displaying works of four centuries of European art. We arrived in Nice by cruise ship and docked in the colourful 'Port Lympia' (port of the clear water), one of the prettiest ports in the Mediterranean. If you are energetic, you can walk from here to the Promenade des Anglais and even to the old town. But no visit to Nice would be complete without exploring the surroundings. If you don't have a lot of time, you might want to consider the short drive to the isolated, medieval village of Eze, which clings like an eagle's nest to the top of a rock, 1400 feet above the sea. Take the Middle Corniche Road to get there, on the way marvel at the gorgeous villas built into the hills, the beautiful flowers and gardens, and at virtually every turn, the magnificent view of the Bay below.perched so high on the rocky peak, has managed to preserve its medieval appearance. Vehicles have to be left below, leaving you to explore this magical place on foot. Narrow, tiny streets wind upward through the village, each building has been meticulously preserved, now housing quaint shops, even a small hotel and restaurant. If I were an artist, this is where I would have to test my skills, each turn revealing a picture so pleasing to the eye. Old stone walls draped with colourful flowers, small arched doorways leading into cool, almost cave-like rooms, where merchants display their wares, and way up on top, a sprawling, exotic cactus garden, unlike any I've ever seen before. Top that off with spectacular panoramic 360 degree views, terra cotta roofs, green hillsides, and the blue sea far below and you'll have to pinch yourself to make sure it's real.

Day 8Port of CallAjaccioArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 5:00p.m.

Overview

Located on the west coast of the island of Corsica, the capital city of Ajaccio is famous as the birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte. This Mediterranean port town enjoys an exceptionally mild climate and offers travelers a number of cafes, restaurants and shops to enjoy in addition to a number of interesting sites, including the Cathedrale Notre-Dame de la Misericorde, where Napoleon was baptized in 1771, and the Chapelle Imperiale, built in 1855 by Napoleon III to accommodate the tombs of the Bonaparte family. Impressive views of the town can be enjoyed from the Jetee de la Citadelle, located next to the 16th-century citadel currently occupied by the army.

Day 9Port of CallRome/CivitavecchiaArrival 6:00a.m.

Overview

Located about 80 kilometres northwest of Rome, the Port of Civitavecchia is the port of Rome and a busy ferry and cargo port serving Italy and southern Europe. Lying on Italy’s eastern shores on the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Port of Civitavecchia has excellent direct connections to Rome. It is an important cruise and ferry port with regular passage to Sardinia, Malta, Sicily, Tunis, and Barcelona. Fishing is of secondary importance to the Port of Civitavecchia. In addition to ocean-going traffic, the Port of Civitavecchia also contains a thermoelectric centre and metallurgical works. In 2006, over 51 thousand people called the Port of Civitavecchia home. The Port of Civitavecchia was built on an earlier Etruscan settlement. Emperor Trajan founded the Port of Civitavecchia in the early 2nd Century, calling it Centumcellae. Today, Trajan’s Port is preserved within today’s Port of Civitavecchia. A busy growing town during the late Roman era, the Port of Civitavecchia was attacked by Vandals and then destroyed by the Saracens in 828 AD. Residents escaped to the nearby Allumiere Mountains where Pope Leo IV built a walled town in 854. Eventually, the people returned to Civitavecchia (the name means “old city”). At the end of the 15th Century, the Port of Civitavecchia was under frequent attack by pirates. The naval arsenal was constructed in 1508. Pope Paul III commissioned the building of the keep, which was designed by Donato Bramante and then finished by Michelangelo in 1537, to protect the Port of Civitavecchia from the pirate attacks. In 1696, Civitavecchia became a free port under Pope Innocent XII. Because it was Rome’s main port, the French occupied the Port of Civitavecchia in 1849. The Port of Civitavecchia was linked to Rome by the Rome and Civitavecchia Rail Road in 1859. When the Port of Civitavecchia became part of the Kingdom of Italy in 1870, it was one of the Papal State’s most strongly-fortified towns when Papal troops welcomed General Nino Bixio on behalf of the Italian unification forces into the Port of Civitavecchia fortress. World War II brought destruction to as much as three-quarters of the Port of Civitavecchia. Reconstruction enlarged the Port of Civitavecchia beyond its pre-war area. The Autorita Portuale Civitavecchia (Port of Rome) is responsible for managing and operating the Port of Civitavecchia as well as the ports of Fiumicino and Gaeta. The modern Port of Civitavecchia is at the centre of rail, road, and air networks that link it with central Italy and the world. The Port of Civitavecchia has capacity to handle about 11 million tons of cargo per year and over 1.5 million passengers. Cargoes include forest products, cereals, iron and steel, chemicals, automobiles, containers, and liquid bulk. In 2007, the Port of Civitavecchia welcomed 856 cruise vessels carrying 1.6 million passengers, and the total number of passengers using ferries and cruise vessels was 3.8 million. In 2007, the Port of Civitavecchia handled a total of 7.7 million tons of cargo. This total included 1.5 million tons of liquid bulk, 1.7 million tons of solid bulk, 4.6 million tons of packages, and 31.1 thousand TEUs of containerized cargo. The Port of Civitavecchia contains 28 berths of a total 5.6 thousand metres in length with alongside depths from 6 to 18 metres. Port properties include five warehouses containing 36 thousand square metres for handling and storing cargoes. The intermodal terminal includes seven thousand square metres of storage space and 12.5 thousand square metres for loading/unloading rail cars and parking. The Port of Civitavecchia is one of the busiest ferry ports in the world. Just 80 kilometres northwest of Rome, it is the main tourist destination for people traveling to the Eternal City. It is also a central port for ferries carrying passengers to more local destinations. The ferry terminal offers a complete line of amenities. Different ferry companies offer services to the various destinations. Moby Lines handles crossings to Olbia, Sardinia. Corsica Sardinia Ferries runs services to Golfo Aranci. Grimaldi Ferries carries passengers to Barcelona and Tunis, and Grand Navi Veloci operates a route to Tunis. Ferrovie dello Stato operates a combined rail-ferry service to Golfo Aranci.

Onboard the Azamara Onward

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Boutique hotels at sea that are not too big or too small. They are perfectly sized to cross oceans, sail into intimate rivers and dock in locations where larger ships can't reach.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Pool - Outdoor

  • Card Room
  • Casino
  • Theatre/Show Lounge
  • Fitness Centre
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Business Centre
  • Concierge Desk
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators
  • Safe Deposit Boxes
  • Self-Service Laundromat

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Full-Service Spa

  • Beauty Salon
  • Fitness Classes
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Internet Centre
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Infirmary/Medical Centre

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Discoveries

Main Dining

Discoveries Restaurant (open seating): Discover the world through dishes and flavors from the places you visit. Whether it's a Destination Immersion dinner buffet or the Destination Immersion cuisine on the dinner menu, give your dining a little local flavor and enjoy on shore tastes onboard! You will also enjoy a wide variety of nightly selections such as filet mignon with black truffle sauce. With its elegant yet lively dining and renewed décor, it's easy to see why this restaurant is the culinary heart of the ship. Reservations are not accepted. It offers an elegant yet lively dining scene with a rotating menu inspired by the destinations on your voyage.

Prime C

Specialty Dining

Aqualina: At Aqualina, you'll find some of Italy's most celebrated dishes as well as contemporary inventive cuisine. Start with lobster ravioli, followed by arugula and radicchio with prosciutto chips, and a Venetian seafood platter. You won't be able to say no to these famous desserts: marsala custard, lemon soufflé, or tiramisu. The chefs love to be inspired, so after an on shore visit to a local market, you can also expect a delectable dish so local, you'll feel like you're not onboard anymore.

Prime C: At Prime C, you're in for more than an array of delectable dining such as steaks cooked to perfection, crab cakes with remoulade, lobster bisque, lamb, game hens and seafood. Last but certainly not least, try the mini cinnamon-sugar donuts with dipping sauces for dessert. Expect a marvelous evening in a warm wood-paneled ambiance with stunning views and lush décor. If the chef has made a visit to a local market while in port, you'll also have an authentic local dish to look forward to.

Specialty Dining: Specialty dining is complimentary for suite guests. For others, there is a US $ 30 per-person cover. Reservations are highly recommended. Due to the popularity of our specialty restaurants and regard for your fellow guests, a US $ 15 late cancellation fee will be charged to your guest folio if a booking is not canceled by noon on the day of your reservation.

Windows Café

Casual Dining

The Patio and Swirl & Top: Casual "pool grill" by day, then fine tablecloths and flickering candles will set the mood for a sit-down al fresco dining experience by night. Taste your way around the world with exclusive personalized dishes using local flavors of the places visited on the Destination Immersion® cuisine dinner menu served by professional wait staff. And for a little touch of whimsy, a self-serve frozen yogurt station—Swirl & Top. With a variety of flavors and your choice of toppings, it's the perfect way to cool off during the day or end your evening meal.

Windows Café: The best way to see where you are in the world is not by looking at your itinerary. It's by checking out the menu at Windows Café! Our daily themed dinner often takes its inspiration from the region we're visiting—Indian, Mexican, Spanish, Italian. We also create an extra live station made from local ingredients purchased in port: Greek salad made with local feta (Greece), pasta prepared with local mushrooms (Italy), fresh Mussels served with garlic bread (Netherlands). Take in the fresh breeze at an outdoor table and relax in the easy and casual atmosphere of the newly renovated Windows Café. Enjoy an intimate breakfast, lunch, or dinner for two or a lively meal for six with our flexible seating options. And speaking of choices, selections change daily. Choose from fresh sushi, stir-fry and pasta, salads, smoked lox and other cold fish, a carving station and of course, desserts.

Mosaic Café and Mosaic @ Night: Comfortable and stylish, Mosaic is the place where you'll find your favourite coffee drinks, just the way you like (for an additional fee). Slip into a comfortable seat and sip for a while. The perfect place to start (or end) your day, no matter where you are in the world. This just might become your favourite area on the ship.

Room Service: Room service is available 24-hours a day. Order from the full breakfast menu between 6:30 AM and 10:00 AM, and have it delivered at your appointed time. Lunch and dinner room service features a menu of hearty soups, fresh salads, gourmet sandwiches, pizzas and desserts.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 12)

Category: 12

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 11)

Category: 11

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 10)

Category: 10

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 09)

Category: 09

Club Oceanview Stateroom (obstructed view) (Category: 08)

Category: 08

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 06)

Category: 06

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 05)

Category: 05

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 04)

Category: 04

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V3)

Category: V3

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V2)

Category: V2

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V1)

Category: V1

Club Veranda Plus Stateroom (Category: P3)

Category: P3

Club Veranda Plus Stateroom (Category: P2)

Category: P2

Club Veranda Plus Stateroom (Category: P1)

Category: P1

Club Continent Suite (Category: N2)

Category: N2

Club Continent Suite (Category: N1)

Category: N1

Club Spa Suite (Category: SP)

Category: SP

Club Ocean Suite (Category: CO)

Category: CO

Club World Owner’s Suite (Category: CW)

Category: CW

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 11
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Wheelchair-Accessible StateroomWheelchair-Accessible Stateroom
Convertible Sofa BedConvertible Sofa Bed
Connecting StateroomsConnecting Staterooms
Interior Stateroom Door LocationInterior Stateroom Door Location
Smoking AreaSmoking Area
Suite with tubSuite with tub

Ship Facts

Azamara Onward ship image
  • Ship Name: Azamara Onward
  • Year Built: 1999
  • Year Refurbished: 2022
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2021
  • Ship Class: OceanLiner
  • Maximum Capacity: 692
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 8
  • Number of Crew: 408
  • Officers' Nationality: International
  • Ocean-View without Balcony: 79
  • Ocean-View with Balcony: 175
  • Total Inside Staterooms: 26
  • Tonnage (GRT): 30,277
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 692
  • Country of Registry: Malta
  • Total Staterooms: 346
  • Suites with Balcony: 66
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy and is valid for select stateroom categories only. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for details.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's Registry: Malta

    Package ID: AZAONWEUR20220908