Europe and Mediterranean: Greece Intensive Voyage

Azamara

Start your voyage in one of the earth's most historic cities, Athens, where a treasure trove of ancient landmarks await. Next, savour the slower pace of Syros, then set sail for a late stay in what's considered the prettiest city in the country, Volos. History buffs will revel in Thessaloniki, the cultural capital of Greece (and home to 15 UNESCO World Heritage Sites). Set your sights on Kavala, a whitewashed city crowned by a 15th century Byzantine castle and surrounded by turquoise waters and white sand. Then, flavour awaits you in Lesvos, where olive oil and Ouzo is as abundant as the quaint cafes that overlook the village square. Next, head to Ephesus, Turkey, for a late night stay. The ancient attractions in Ephesus are truly exceptional, including the Library of Celsus, the Odeon, and the marble-made Arcadian Street. During your late night in Santorini, set aside time to indulge in the panoramic views and a glass of Vinsanto—a pairing we promise will pleasure your palate. Travel to medieval times with a quick stop in Monemvasia before moving on to another late stay in Katakolon—discover the home of Olympia and its stadium, temples, and monuments dating back to 776 BC. As your trip winds down, enjoy a late night on the mythical island of Corfu—Shakespeare's set for his last play, The Tempest. Reflect on the fairytale-like landscape and flora as you spend a day at sea, then complete your voyage in Venice, Italy.

Included Extras

  • AzAmazing Evenings® event (on most voyages of seven nights or longer)

  • Select standard spirits, international beers and wines

  • Bottled water, soft drinks, specialty coffees and teas

  • Self-service laundry

  • Shuttle service to and from port communities where available

  • Concierge services for personal guidance and reservations

  • Gratuities

Executive Member Benefit

  • Executive Members earn an annual 2% Reward on Costco Travel purchases

Costco Shop Card

  • Member Exclusive: Costco Shop Card with every Azamara sailing†

Sailing Itinerary

Note: Cruise itineraries are subject to change. Please verify ports and times directly with the cruise line.

Day 1Port of CallAthens/PiraeusDeparture 5:00p.m.

Overview

Today Piraeus is the home base of Greek shipping, the largest commercial fleet in the world, apace bound to the sea like few others. The harbours of Zea and Mikrolimano as well as Phaliro play host to countless yachts and sailing craft throughout the year. Piraeus was known in medieval times as Porto Leone, a name due to the enormous stone lion, which guarded the port's entrance. Today, the life of Piraeus is centred on its three ports: the main, central one and those of Zea and Mikrolimano. You can walk around the central harbour, shared by cargo and passenger ships alike, and watch the constant comings and goings of goods and people from around the world. Having completed your tour of the central harbour of Piraeus you will then head south traversing the peninsula and arrive at Peiraiki, one of the most picturesque neighbour hoods in the city. Here one finds the harbour of Zea, one of the largest marinas in the Mediterranean. If the night finds you in the area, you can try one of the many bars found nearby. You can continue your tour along the waterfront heading towards Kastella but a small deviation toward the city centre will be useful for then you can visit the verdant square of the municipal Theatre with cafeterias and shops of all kinds surrounding it. The magnificent building housing the Municipal Theatre as well as the Town Hall and the Library complete the picture presented by the main square in the city. Piraeus's little natural harbours are among its busiest and most touristy areas: Mikrolimano, Passalimani, Zea, Freatida and Hatzikiriakio. Countless seaside tavernas provide delicious seafood washed down with the uniquely Greek drink, ouzo. The fresh smell of the sea and the sounds made by the assortment of caiques, yachts and sailing ships, which are moored next to the tables, complete the enjoyment of the food Beyond the port, the most impressive spots are the hills of Profitis Ilias and Kastela with their neoclassical mansions and modern buildings which look as they are hanging over the sea.

Day 2Port of CallSyros IslandArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 6:00p.m.

Overview

Syros or Siros or Syra is a Greek island in the Cyclades, in the Aegean Sea. It is located 78 nautical miles (144 km) south-east of Athens. The area of the island is 83.6 km2 (32 sq mi) and it has 21,507 inhabitants (2011 census).[1] The largest towns are Ermoupoli, Ano Syros, and Vari (el). Ermoupoli is the capital of the island and of the Cyclades. It has always been a significant port town, and during the 19th century it was even more significant than Piraeus. Other villages are Galissas, Foinikas, Pagos, Manna, Kini and Poseidonia.

Day 3Port of CallVolosArrival 7:30a.m.Departure 8:00p.m.

Overview

Volos is the capital city of the region of Magnesia. It was built at the foot of the mountain of Pelion, and is 325km from Athens, and 216km from Thessalonica. The ancient city "Dimitrias", which is situated a little further out from where Volos is today, was established in the 3rd century BC by the Macedonian king "Dimitrios the Sieger". By the middle of the 6th century AD, it was the centre for shipbuilding. At the town of "Palaia" (Old) the castle of Volos was built. It was here that a market square was created and trading of products began by the people of Pelion and the valley of Thessaly. To protect the market from raiders, a small fortress was built. This was known as the "Kastrin" (Little castle). This fort, through the years, was under the leaderships of Byzantine leaders and Ottomon leaders during the Turkish occupation. In 1665 the fortress was attacked, for the last time, by the Venetian navy under the leadership of Morosini.After this attack, they started to build small stores for the products, which were mainly cereals, from the valley of Thessaly. These stores started to spread around the port. Eventually small houses for the traders started to be built around the east side of the castle. After 1830, a large number of villagers and craftsmen from the villages of Pelion and from the new state of Greece and other Hellenistic centres started building houses and workshops around the port. This was the beginning of large-scale trading in the area, which was continuously getting bigger and bigger. When Thessaly joined in with the Greek state, a large trading market started, and by the end of the century there was an explosion in trade and industry. This resulted in the port of Volos becoming the second biggest trade port in Greece after Piraeus. With the port continuously expanding, the rail operation developed to connect Volos with the rest of Greece. This became the fastest and cheapest means of the transportation of both products and people, and helped in Volos becoming a very rich city. In turn, this increase in wealth also helped building and development in the area and work started on many neoclassic buildings and churches, such as Agioi Konstantinoss, Agios Nikoloas and the church of Metamorphosis. The railway station and many workshops were also constructed during these prosperous times. This development took place at a fast rate and many industries started establishing themselves. Textile, ore and ceramic industries started and led to more wealth and power. The steam train of Pelion "Moutzouris-Smudgy" was built by the Italian engineer Evaristo de Kiriko, and connected the previously unapproachable villages with the port of Volos. Again, this led to an increase in trades and markets. In 1922, after the disaster in Asia Minor, many refugees fled and headed to Volos, where they found new homes and began a new life. They also contributed in trading and developments in the city. A very important landmark in the city's development was the big earthquake in 1955 when almost the whole city was destroyed. The city was rebuilt and is how you see it today. Volos is a very lively city, and its port connects with the North Sporades, and has connections with ports all over the world. The rail lines connect it with the rest of Greece and more recently the airport at Anhialos. Today Volos is a big industrial centre and has the third largest port in Greece. Volos consists of the municipalities of Neas Ionias and Iolkos. Volos has a very famous and high-quality open market, which is on level with any other markets throughout cities in Greece. Volos is a very happy and pleasant city. One thing you must do is to visit one of the fish tavernas, "tripouradika", and enjoy fish titbits and tsipouro. Once you have experienced this, you will forever have this picture in your mind and heart.

Day 4Port of CallThessalonikiArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 6:00p.m.

Overview

When a Greek tells you he's from Athens, he always sounds a bit apologetic, or regretful; Greeks from Thessaloniki, on the other hand, sound, if not smug, very pleased to be from Greece's "Second City." Thessaloniki may be second to Athens in political importance and population, but in popular songs, Thessaloniki is celebrated as "the mother of Macedonia," "the most blessed of cities," and "the city whose praises are sung." You, too, may be tempted to sing this city's praises when you take in its wonderful situation along the broad expanse of the Thermaic Gulf. You're never far from the sea here; when you least expect it, you'll catch a glimpse of waves and boats in the distance. Alas, especially in the summer, you'll almost certainly get less pleasant whiffs of the harbour's ripe, polluted odour. If you're very lucky, you'll see Mount Olympus while you're here: Pollution has increasingly obscured even that imposing landmark. Greeks are fond of reminding foreigners that when their ancestors were painting themselves blue, or living in rude huts, Greeks were sitting in the shade of the Parthenon, reading the plays of Sophocles. Similarly, Thessalonians like to remind Athenians that when Athens languished in the long twilight of its occupation by the Romans and Ottomans, Thessaloniki flourished. It's true: Thessaloniki's strategic location on the main land route from Europe into Asia made it a powerful city during the Roman Empire -- you'll see many monuments built here by the 4th-century A.D. emperor Galerius. During the Byzantine Empire (the 4th-15th centuries A.D.), Thessaloniki boasted that it was second only to the capital, Constantinople. That's when Thessaloniki's greatest pride, its superb and endearing churches, were built. After the Turks conquered the Byzantine Empire, Thessaloniki continued to flourish as an important commercial centre and port. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, the city's Jewish community was so strong and so prosperous that some called Thessaloniki the "second Jerusalem." Then, in August 1917, a devastating fire destroyed 80% of the city. Phoenix-like, Thessaloniki rose from the ashes. Unfortunately, only part of the city was rebuilt according to the grand plan of the French architect Ernest Hébrard -- in part because of the 130,000 Greek refugees from Asia Minor who flooded into Thessaloniki between 1922 and 1923, almost doubling the city's population and leading to enormous unregulated development. Still, Thessaloniki has the broad tree-lined boulevards and parks that Athens so sadly lacks. After World War II, and again in the 1960s, two more growth spurts left much of the city's outskirts crowded and ugly -- and all too much of the city centre lined with bland apartment buildings. You'll notice, however, that Thessaloniki has none of the horizon-blocking skyscrapers that have proliferated in Athens -- earthquake regulations forbid this. The last major earthquake was in 1978. Glimpses of the sea, tree-lined streets, magnificent Byzantine churches -- all these make visiting Thessaloniki delightful. And there's something else here that's quite wonderful: the food. In part, this is because of the long tradition of Macedonian cuisine; in part, because the refugees who came here from Turkey in 1922 brought with them the zesty cuisine of the Pontus (the area around the Black Sea where most of the refugees had lived). In addition, this is still a city whose establishments are supported by local customers. There are no restaurants here -- as yet -- that make their living off tourists. If you're a visitor to Thessaloniki, you'll appreciate all this. You'll also enjoy the fact that Thessaloniki's location in the virtual centre of Macedonia makes it the perfect place from which to set off to the sites associated with Philip II of Macedon and his son Alexander the Great. If you are a man, you can also take in the monasteries of Mount Athos, the Holy Mountain. If you are a woman, you'll have that much more time to enjoy Thessaloniki -- or to sit patiently in the little port of Ouranopolis, the jumping-off point for Mount Athos, and envy those lucky enough to travel on to the Holy Mountain. High Season -- The busiest time of the year in Thessaloniki is not summer, but fall, when the International Trade Fair and Festival of Greek Songs take place in September, followed by the Demitria celebrations of the city's patron saints in October and November. There is also a Film Festival here in November. If you come between September and November, be sure to book a hotel in advance -- and be prepared to pay top money for your room (price hikes of 25% are common). Strategies for Seeing Thessaloniki -- Our suggestions on exploring Thessaloniki are really just that: suggestions. Unlike Athens, which few visitors would be bold enough to visit without seeing the Acropolis, Thessaloniki has no one "must-see" monument. Some might argue that the splendid Archaeological Museum or the Museum of Byzantine Culture fit the bill, but others would plead the case of the Upper City (Ano Poli), the old Turkish Quarter. Still others would recommend a loop through both the Upper City and the city centre to take in as many Byzantine churches and Roman monuments as possible. In short, you're here to enjoy the city itself: a city filled with Byzantine churches and chapels, a city with squares built around Roman palaces, whose markets pulse with life, and whose harborside cafes and promenade refresh the weary.

Day 5Port of CallKavalaArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 6:00p.m.

Overview

Kavala, which is the main city of Eastern Macedonia and is an important tobacco-growing area and port in the north of Greece. It is very close to the frontiers of both Turkey and Bulgaria and each of these countries has ruled over the city during the 20th century. Kavala has a long and complex history, and includes buildings of Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman origin. It is very close to the Roman city of Philippi, where Octavian and Mark Anthony finally defeated Brutus and Cassius and to whose citizens St. Paul wrote one of his epistles. Modern Kavala is served by a busy international airport, which is used by tour companies to provide access to the nearby island of Thassos. As in Roman times, it lies on the main road from Europe to Asia Minor and it was a stopping point on the "hippy trail" to India and Nepal in the sixties and seventies. The photograph shows the beautiful harbour of Kavala crowned by a byzantine fort.

Day 6Port of CallMytiliniArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 6:00p.m.

Overview

Mytilini is not a town. It's a city. But it is an amazing little city full of life and surprises and if you are someone with a long history in Greece it may actually remind you of Athens or Pireaus in the fifties. Like other great cities Mytilini is built upon seven hills and is full of history. Mytilini is in fact one of the most culturally enlightened city in Greece perhaps due to its proximity to the coast of Asia Minor where the ancient Greeks flourished until 1922 when they were forcefully evicted by the Turks. Many of these Greeks had property in Mytilini and many Mytilinians had businesses in Asia Minor. For this reason the museums are full of interesting remnants of the last three thousand years of history and the town itself contains monuments, houses, churches, schools and other buildings from the various historical periods. But it is the Mytilini of today that holds the most interest for many because it is a small and managable city full of great restaurants, cafes, nightlife and friendly, intelligent people. When you arrive by boat at 7 in the morning it is quiet. The city spreads from the large harbour up into the hills behind it and is crowned by an enormous castle whose foundations were laid during the time of Justinian on the ruins of an even more ancient fortification. This castle is surrounded by a pine forest that reaches down to the shore and the public beach. In the summertime the castle is used for performances of traveling groups of musicians, theatre, opera and music and art festivals. In fact it is one of the best places to hear a concert in Greece. The castle is well worth a trip and a walk around the promontory will give you a whole new perspctive of the city because it is like being out in the wilderness with horses and donkeys grazing on the hills that lead up to the fort. If you continue to the back side of the city you will come to the old bordellos and the old harbour. The waterfront comes alive with traffic by 8 and stays that way until just after 1 pm when the stores close and everyone goes home for lunch and siesta. By early evening the city is alive again with activity. This is not your typical quiet Greek island village but it is certainly a very entertaining place. The main street is lined with cafes that seem to be full year round. For the rest of the island Mytilini is the big city. Smaller villages send their children here for high-school. People come from all over the island to do their shopping since there are super-markets in the true sense of the word, with aisle after aisle of products, imported and domestic. There are cultural activities, concerts of all styles of music, basketball tournaments, an indoor swimming pool and of course the city is the centre of island Government, not only for Lesvos but for Lemnos too. The marketplace is one of the most active in Greece with shops of every variety and closed to automobile traffic while the stores are open. There is ample evidence of the plentiful fish in Lesvos waters and prices are low. When I arrive by ferry in the early morning I usually spend an hour or so wandering around, checking out the fish and buying sardeles pastes or pastrama (dried spiced beef-like pastrami) to bring as gifts to my friend Tryphon to serve with ouzo in his cafeneon on the far side of the island. It is hard to imagine a more interesting way to spend a morning and the shops contain a variety of items that you won't find anywhere else and to me are more entertaining than a museum. If you require stong coffee to get you going to the small traditional looking cafe right across the street from the yogurt shop (that has the best yogurt in the world). It is called the Musico Cafeneon and it is on the corner of Komninaki street. if you are just getting off the boat it is a great place to gather your thoughts and drink an espresso or two. The owner is a woman named Martina and she or one of her staff can answer any questions you have upon arrival. If you are staying in the city, day or night it is a great place to hang out.

Day 7Port of CallKusadasiArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 10:00p.m.

Overview

This seaside resort town has grown immensely in the last 30 years, and is especially popular with package holiday-makers from Europe. From a population of 6000 in the 1970s, it is now closer to 50,000, although a high proportion of this are part of the tourist industry and here only for the summer. Many cruising ships travelling around the Aegean Islands stop here, especially because of its close proximity (20km) to Selcuk. Kusadasi is a good base to explore this and other ancient cities like Priene and Didyma. Although there is little of historical interest in Kusadasi itself, the town is popular predominantly because of its many hotels, restaurants, souvenir and carpet shops, and lively nightlife. The Kale district has some old traditional houses and narrow streets, and gives some indication of what the town used to be like. The most famous beach is Kadinlar Plaji, 2.5km south of the town, dominated by huge hotels and can get very crowded in summer. There are several small beaches further south, and closer to town is Yilanci Burnu, the peninsular.

Day 8Port of CallThira/SantoriniArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 8:00p.m.

Overview

Fira is a comparatively modern town, with houses built mostly during the 19th century when the old Venetian capital at Skaros became untenable due to earthquakes. The architecture is a jumble of Cycladic and Venetian, side by side, the similarities between the two being the stark whiteness. The impact of Aegean tourism has made itself felt in Fira, judging from the abundance of taverns, hotels, discotheques and shops. It is the largest town on the island and has gained preference with travelers because it is central and access to other parts of Santorini is made easy by either taxi or bus. From there you can indulge in some inspiring coastal walks. Wandering through the white cobbled streets of Fira, a town of about 2,000 inhabitants, one gets the feel of the old-world charm blended in with the modern day comforts. The town's archaeological museum is crammed with finds from excavations at Akrotiri. But besides being so interesting archaeologically, Santorini is essentially a beauty spot, an island whose cliffs seem to glow under an exceptionally clear light all day, but which at sunset glow redly, evoking that vast explosion more than 3000 years ago.

Day 9Port of CallMonemvasiaArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 6:00p.m.

Overview

At the far end of Peloponnese, on the south eastern coast of the peninsula looking on to Mirtoon Sea, at a distance of 95 km form the town of Sparta, stands Monemvasia. Today a causeway bridges the gap that separates the former peninsula from the mainland and leads us behind the fortification walls into a unique, intact medieval city - state, a refuge for many artists in our own day. Apart from old mansions, it possesses a wealth of Byzantine churches - around forty of them. Among the most outstanding are Ayia Anna, a 14th century basilica, Ayios Nikolaos (18th century), the Panayia Kritikia, Ayios Stephanos in Italian - Byzantine style (16th century), and Ayios Pavlos (10th century). The most important of all is the church of Christ Elkomenos (13th century), Monemvasia's cathedral, with its four Byzantine icons and its two marble imperial thrones. The architecture of the houses betrays a strong Venetian influence, with the chimneys facing east and the balconies overlooking the sea. On the top of the rock stands the Castle itself, while the church of Ayia Sophia (13th century) stands at its steepest point. This is a rare example of an octagonal church with dome; there are a few frescoes preserved within. The new village of Nea Monemvassia lies just a thousand metres from the causeway on the mainland. It is a modern tourist resort with fine beaches. Northwest of Monemvassia, on the road to Sparta, is the farming town of Molai, where there are the remains of a medieval fortress and an early Christian church. At Halasmata it's worth stopping to see the mosaic floors in the three ruined 6th century churches there. One of the prettiest sandy beaches in the Peloponnese, Elias, is just 9 km from Molai. Neapolis, a seaside resort much favoured by Greeks because of its beautiful, long beaches, lies to the south of Monemvasia. From Neapolis it is easy to cross over to Elafonisos, a small island blessed with beaches worthy of a tropical paradise, backed with sand dunes and pinewoods. Fresh fish abound in this part of the Peloponnese. Kiparissi, to the north of Monemvasia and southeast of Sparta, is a charming coastal village which has recently developed into a resort attracting those who like "to get away from it all". It has three marvelous stretches of beach lining three successive coves. If you have time, patience and a love for the Greek landscape, Laconia in the southern portion of the Peloponnese has countless more delightful spots to reward the explorer. A distinctly shaped great rock - "capsized ship" according to Greek poet Yiannis Ritsos - rising from the sea, only a few metres from the coast is often referred as the "Gibraltar of Greece". A thin strip of land links it with the Gefyra, a fishing village on the main land. It takes 15 to 20 minutes walking from Gefyra to Monemvasia. On the north side of the bay there are a few houses consisting the small village of Palea (old) Monemvasia. Walking along the road you find the cemetery where in 1989 the famous Greek poet Ioannis Ritsos was buried as it was his motherland. After the cemetery you reach the lower town of Monemvasia which is called "the Fortress" today. A wall protects the lower town from three sides east, south and west. There are several churches around like Panagia Chrisafitissa, Panagia Mirtidiotissa, Christos Elkomenos, Agia Sofia. On the east side of the main square stands the house with a garden containing the remains of the early Byzantine church. At the west end of the square there is the "Stellakis" house as it is known, that was reconstructed giving a lot of information about the architectural details and the appearance of the medieval town. A small zigzag path connects the lower town with the upper town and it was difficult not only for the attackers but for the residents to curry their supplies using their hands or their donkeys. The Fort city of Monemvasia with the one and only gate as its name suggests, turns a dream into reality. The site on which the rock now stands was called Minoa and was probably used by ancient Cretans seafarers as a base. That was where Greeks sought refuge from Slav invaders. They fortified the site using it as a harbour. The church of Agia Sofia overlooks the region at the bleakest part of the rock and is one of the most beautiful worship spots in Greece. You will walk past a mosque converted into a museum, along an uphill path that takes you to the Fort. Old stone built mansions now used as inns and hotels form arcades over steps and greenery creating an environment of superb beauty.

Day 10Port of CallKatakolonArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 8:00p.m.

Overview

Almost 25km. from Ancient Olympia, is located the medieval Katakolo , in the district of ancient Pheia, which is, known today as the port of Pirgos, capital of our prefecture. Katakolo is a small town, with many shops, bars and good fish taverns, with fresh and tasty fish. The bay of Agios Andreas, is located next to Katakolo, on the top of a hill, is located the ruins of Pontikokastro, a very strong fort in the past, the period of Villehardouins. At Agios Andreas, everyone can enjoy coffee or a drink, admiring the sea and the gorgeous sunset.

Day 11Port of CallCorfuArrival 8:00a.m.Departure 8:00p.m.

Overview

Corfu Town (Kerkyra) is a principal port and the largest town in the Ionian islands. It is built between two Venetian castles, having its own unique atmosphere. It is a thriving mass of shops and businesses, set amongst a captivating and charming assortment of elegant buildings, churches, imposing fortresses and narrow alleyways leading to hidden squares. The tall buildings with the 'volta' (arches), the 'cantounia' (narrow flagstoned streets), the 'mouragia' (sea-walls) are showing all a clear Italian influence. One of the most beautiful walks in the town is around the Esplanade (Spianada square), one of the biggest squares in Europe which is the hub of the Corfiot's life. Here you can walk around or sit in one of the many cafe bars underneath the arches of the 'Liston', a name probably derived from a similar promenade in Venice. Liston was built during the imperial French occupation and is reminiscent of the larger 'Arcades' of the Rue de Rivoli in Paris. On the upper side of Esplanade stands a memorial to the British Lord High Commissioner Sir Thomas Maitland, built in 1816 in the shape of a circular building with Ionian columns. The Corfiots call this building 'sterna' (cistern) because this was where the entrance to the largest underground cistern of the town was to be found. Near the Maitland's monument, in front of the building where the Ionian Academy was housed, stands the statue of John Capodistrias, the first President of Greece. It is a work from the end of the 19th century showing the Governor standing deep in thought. Opposite the Liston is the the Old Fortress and 'Anthonas', the Municipal Gardens. In the gardens is the statue of Lord Guilford, showing the founder of the Ionian Academy in his academic robes holding an open book. Nearby are the busts of two famous Corfiots, the poet Lorenzo Mavilis and the writer Dinos Theotokis. At the northern end of Esplanade stands the Palace of St. Michael and St. George, one of the most elegant buildings in Corfu. Opposite the west front of the palace is a beautiful building which now houses the Reading Society of Corfu, the oldest cultural institute in modern Greece, founded in 1836. The Reading Society contains a unique library of Greek and foreign books as well as a large collection of manuscripts, newspapers, periodicals, paintings, maps and engravings mostly related to the Ionian islands. As one's gaze leaves the Esplanade, after lingering on the palace, it embraces a magnificent view towards the coastal road (Arseniou Street) with its sea-walls. Following along this road will take you to the Old Harbour of Corfu and the other Venetian castle, the one called the New Fortress. Along this road the narrow lanes ('cantounia') lead to the Campielo, the oldest quarter of the town. Here the visitor can find the oldest houses and many of the historic churches in Corfu. At the northern end of Capodistria Street stands the Capodistria Mansion, an excellent example of neo-classical architecture. It was built in 1835 by the Corfiot architect John Chronis and is considered one of the most beautiful buildings in Greece. Here John Capodistrias, the first President of Greece, was born. Another notable landmark in the old town is the central market. The most interesting street here is Nickiforou Theotoki as the rows upon rows of 'volta' standing on their stone columns and the tall buildings form one of the most characteristic aspects of Corfu Town. In a little square on Nickiforou Theotoki Street stands the building of the Ionian Bank, which was built in 1846 displaying a well-proportioned facade with finely detailed Ionian pilasters and pediment. On the first floor of the building the Paper Money Museum is housed. At the far end of the square is the Church of St. Spyridon. It shelters the body of St. Spyridon, the patron saint of Corfu and one of the great Saints of Greek Orthodoxy and draws a constant stream of pilgrims from all over Greece every year. On the Evgeniou Voulgareos Street stands the crenellated belfry of the Roman Catholic Church of the Annunciation a venerable building from the end of the 14th century. The whole building was destroyed in the World War II bombing, and the only remains are the belfry, two inscriptions and a bas-relief representing war trophies. Between Evgeniou Voulgareos Street and a modern square stands the most elegant of the Venetian buildings in Corfu, the Town Hall in baroque style. At the end of Moustoxydi Street stands another building of the period of British rule, the historic the Ionian Parliament. At the junction of the Garitsa coastal road and Alexandras Avenue stands the Douglas Obelisk, which also belongs to the same period, erected in honour of the Lord High Commissioner Sir Howard Douglas, to whom Corfu owes a lot of public works and philanthropic institutions.

Day 12 Cruising
Day 13Port of CallVenice/ItalyArrival 6:00a.m.

Overview

One of the most beautiful and romantic cities in the world, Venice is simply magical. The city is surrounded by water; the quiet canals are like city streets crossed by little bridges. There are no cars; it is a pedestrian haven. The piazza San Marco, one of the most beautiful squares in the world, is crowded with pigeons and people during the day, but at night becomes an open-air ballroom. Music from several orchestras wafts across the candlelit square. It is a place for lovers and lovers of art and beauty. But, the very thing that makes Venice so special is also a threat. The water has been rising and exceptionally high tides have been flooding the square and eroding the buildings. Much thought and care has been given to finding ways to preserve this special city, but we would waste no time in visiting Venice as soon as you can. It is worth a lot to see this treasure before it is too late.

Onboard the Azamara Journey

Costco Member Reviews

4.3 of 5 stars4.3/5 (22 Reviews)

Ship Rating

4.0/5

Azamara Journey® features more balconies than many cruise ships and butler service in each suite. Like it's sister ship, Quest, it's a mid-sized beauty with a deck plan well-suited to the needs of modern voyagers.

Onboard Activities

Activities & Services (included in cruise)

Pool - Outdoor

  • Card Room
  • Casino
  • Theatre/Show Lounge
  • Fitness Centre
  • Sauna/Steam Room
  • Pool - Outdoor
  • Whirlpool/Jacuzzi
  • Bars/Lounges
  • Business Centre
  • Concierge Desk
  • Duty-Free Shops/Boutiques
  • Elevators
  • Safe Deposit Boxes

Activities & Services (available for an extra fee)

Full-Service Spa

  • Beauty Salon
  • Fitness Classes
  • Full-Service Spa
  • Internet Centre
  • Dry Cleaning/ Laundry Service
  • Infirmary/Medical Centre
  • Self-Service Laundromat

Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the cruise line without notice. Staterooms designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Dining

Discoveries

Main Dining

Discoveries Restaurant (open seating): Discover the world through dishes and flavours from the places you visit. Whether it’s a Destination Immersion dinner buffet or the Destination Immersion cuisine on the dinner menu, give your dining a little local flavour and enjoy on shore tastes onboard! You will also enjoy a wide variety of nightly selections such as filet mignon with black truffle sauce. With its elegant yet lively dining and renewed décor, it’s easy to see why this restaurant is the culinary heart of the ship. Reservations are not accepted. Choose being seated at a table for two or as part of a larger group of fellow guests.

Prime C

Specialty Dining

Aqualina: At Aqualina, you’ll find some of Italy’s most celebrated dishes as well as contemporary inventive cuisine. Start with lobster ravioli, followed by arugula and radicchio with prosciutto chips, and a Venetian seafood platter. You won’t be able to say no to these famous desserts: marsala custard, lemon soufflé, or tiramisu. The chefs love to be inspired, so after an on shore visit to a local market, you can also expect a delectable dish so local, you’ll feel like you’re not onboard anymore.

Prime C: At Prime C, you’re in for more than an array of delectable dining such as steaks cooked to perfection, crab cakes with remoulade, lobster bisque, lamb, game hens and seafood. Last but certainly not least, try the mini cinnamon-sugar donuts with dipping sauces for dessert. Expect a marvelous evening in a warm wood-paneled ambiance with stunning views and lush décor. If the chef has made a visit to a local market while in port, you’ll also have an authentic local dish to look forward to.

Specialty Dining: Guests staying in a suite are welcome to dine any night of the voyage in Aqualina or Prime C at no charge. Guests who have booked a Club Veranda, Club Oceanview, or Club Interior stateroom are subject to a USD 30 per-person cover charge in Aqualina or Prime C.

Windows Café

Casual Dining

Windows Café: The best way to see where you are in the world is not by looking at your itinerary, but by checking out the menu at Windows Café! The daily themed dinner often takes its inspiration from the region you are visiting. There’s even a live station made from local ingredients purchased in port: Greek salad made with local feta (Greece), pasta prepared with local mushrooms (Italy), fresh Mussels served with garlic bread (Netherlands). Take in the fresh breeze at an outdoor table and relax in the easy and casual atmosphere of the newly renovated Windows Café. Enjoy an intimate breakfast, lunch, or dinner for two or a lively meal for six with flexible seating options. And speaking of choices, selections change daily. Choose from fresh sushi, stir-fry and pasta, salads, smoked lox and other cold fish, a carving station and of course, desserts.

The Patio: Casual “pool grill” by day, then fine tablecloths and flickering candles will set the mood for a sit-down al fresco dining experience by night. Taste your way around the world with exclusive personalized dishes using local flavours of the places visited on the Destination Immersion® cuisine dinner menu served by professional wait staff.

Mosaic Café: Comfortable and stylish, Mosaic is the place where you’ll find your favourite coffee drinks, just the way you like (for an additional fee). Slip into a comfortable seat and sip for a while. The perfect place to start (or end) your day, no matter where you are in the world. This just might become your favourite area on the ship.

Room Service: Room service is available 24-hours a day. Order from the full breakfast menu between 6:30 AM and 10:00 AM, and have it delivered at your appointed time. Lunch and dinner room service features a menu of hearty soups, fresh salads, gourmet sandwiches, pizzas and desserts.


Times, costs and other specifics are outside the control of Costco Travel. All information is at the sole discretion of the cruise line and is subject to change without notice. Dining time and table size preferences are submitted to the cruise line on a first-come, first-served request basis and are confirmed aboard ship. Questions, concerns and/or special needs regarding dining arrangements must be addressed with the maitre d' hotel aboard ship. Every effort is made to accommodate travelers' preferences; however, Costco Travel cannot guarantee dining arrangements. In specialty restaurants, space is limited and reservations are recommended. A cover charge and dress code may apply.

Staterooms

Alluring inside staterooms feature modern amenities, furnishings and European linens.

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 12)

Category: 12

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • 40" flat-screen television
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 11)

Category: 11

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • 40" flat-screen television
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 10)

Category: 10

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • 40" flat-screen television
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Interior Stateroom (Category: 09)

Category: 09

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • 40" flat-screen television
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Guarantee - Inside (Category: Z)

Category: Z
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Attractive staterooms feature an ocean view or an obstructed view, with either a picture window or a porthole, plus standard features and amenities.

Club Oceanview Stateroom (obstructed view) (Category: 08)

Category: 08

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Some staterooms feature sofa bed
  • 40" flat-screen TV
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 06)

Category: 06

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Some staterooms feature sofa bed
  • 40" flat-screen TV
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 05)

Category: 05

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Some staterooms feature sofa bed
  • 40" flat-screen TV
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Oceanview Stateroom (Category: 04)

Category: 04

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Some staterooms feature sofa bed
  • 40" flat-screen TV
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Guarantee - Oceanview (Category: Y)

Category: Y
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Elegantly appointed staterooms feature modern amenities and furnishings, a veranda, a sitting area with sofa bed and floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors.

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V1)

Category: V1

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Sitting area with 40" flat-screen TV
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V2)

Category: V2

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Sitting area with 40" flat-screen TV
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Veranda Stateroom (Category: V3)

Category: V3

  • Completely refurbished with fresh contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one Queen size bed
  • Sitting area with 40" flat-screen TV
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hairdryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Guarantee - Balcony (Category: X)

Category: X
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Suite amenities include butler service, limited internet minutes, specialty dining, free bag of laundry, in-suite tea service, and an additional onboard credit for Top Suites

Club Ocean Suite (Category: CO)

Category: CO

  • Completely refurbished with elegant contemporary décor in 2016
  • Spacious living room with a separate master bedroom
  • Master bedroom with one queen size bed and a 55" flat-screen television
  • 55" flat-screen television in living room
  • Marble master bathroom with shower. Journey and Quest suites feature a tub.
  • Dressing room with vanity and ample closet space
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors in living room and master bedroom
  • Spacious 233 sq.ft. (21.7 sq.m.) veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer

Club World Owner’s Suite (Category: CW)

Category: CW

  • Completely refurbished with elegant contemporary décor in 2016
  • Spacious living room with a separate master bedroom
  • Master bedroom with one queen size bed and a 40" flat-screen television
  • 55" flat-screen television in living room
  • Marble master bathroom with shower. Journey and Quest suites feature a tub.
  • Dressing room with vanity and ample closet space
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors in living room and master bedroom
  • Spacious 233 sq.ft. (21.7 sq.m.) veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer

Club Continent Suite (Category: N1)

Category: N1

  • Completely refurbished with elegant contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one queen size bed
  • Spacious and comfortable sitting area
  • 55" flat-screen television in sitting area
  • Roomy bathroom with shower. Some also feature a tub.
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Continent Suite (Category: N2)

Category: N2

  • Completely refurbished with elegant contemporary décor in 2016
  • Two lower beds convertible to one queen size bed
  • Spacious and comfortable sitting area
  • 55" flat-screen television in sitting area
  • Roomy bathroom with shower. Some also feature a tub.
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer
  • USB ports under bedside reading lamps

Club Spa Suite (Category: SP)

Category: SP

  • Newly built suites in 2016 with an elegant organic décor
  • Two lower beds convertible to one queen size bed
  • Spacious glass-enclosed bathtub
  • Separate rain shower
  • Comfortable sitting area
  • 55" flat-screen television in sitting area
  • Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors
  • Veranda
  • Mini-bar
  • Thermostat-controlled air conditioner
  • Direct-dial telephone with voice mail
  • Writing desk
  • In-room safe
  • Hand-held hair dryer

Guarantee - Suite (Category: W)

Category: W
This category can be booked for a special rate, guaranteed to you. Please note that the category is not associated at the time of booking with a specific stateroom, deck, bedding configuration or other particular settings. The assignment of an actual cabin will be performed during your check-in. The cabin can be anywhere on the ship.

Deck Plan

Cruise Ship
Deck 11
Key to Symbols
SymbolDescription
Wheelchair-Accessible StateroomWheelchair-Accessible Stateroom
Convertible Sofa BedConvertible Sofa Bed
Connecting StateroomsConnecting Staterooms
Interior Stateroom Door LocationInterior Stateroom Door Location
Smoking AreaSmoking Area
Suite with tubSuite with tub

Ship Facts

Azamara Journey ship image
  • Ship Name: Azamara Journey
  • Year Built: 2000
  • Year Refurbished: 2016
  • Year Entered Present Fleet: 2007
  • Ship Class: Journey
  • Maximum Capacity: 690
  • Number of Passenger Decks: 8
  • Number of Crew: 408
  • Officers' Nationality: International
  • Ocean-View without Balcony: 73
  • Ocean-View with Balcony: 200
  • Total Inside Staterooms: 26
  • Tonnage (GRT): 30,277
  • Capacity Based on Double Occupancy: 690
  • Country of Registry: Malta
  • Total Staterooms: 345
  • Suites with Balcony: 46
  • Crew/Hotel Staff Nationality: International
Costco Travel makes every effort to verify the accuracy of all information provided. Additional fees for amenities or services may be charged by the hotel, resort or cruise line. Amenities or services may be discontinued or revised by the provider without notice. Hotels, resorts, ships or accommodations designated as wheelchair-accessible do not necessarily meet ADA requirements. Costco Travel is not responsible for inaccuracies or provider modifications.

Reviews

Available Dates & Prices

Departure Date

Inside Stateroom

Ocean View Stateroom

Balcony Stateroom

Suite Stateroom

Terms & Conditions

*Price shown is per person based on double occupancy and is valid for select stateroom categories only. Click on Terms & Conditions link below for details.

†The exact amount of the Costco Shop Card will be calculated during the booking process. Click on the Terms & Conditions link below for additional information.

Ship's Registry: Malta

    Package ID: AZAJOUEUR20220924